Read an Excerpt from Mary Cecilia Jackson’s Sparrow

Hi book nerds! Today, I’m excited to be sharing an excerpt from Mary Cecilia Jackson’s Young Adult debut novel Sparrow.

Make sure to follow the official Sparrow blog tour hosted by JeanBookNerd to see more excerpts, reviews, and interviews!

Now, let’s find out more about the book!

Title: Sparrow
Author: Mary Cecilia Jackson
Hardcover: 368 pages
Publisher: 
Tor Teen (March 17, 2020)
Language:
English
ISBN-10:
0765398850
ISBN-13:
978-0765398857

Goodreads synopsis:

In the tradition of Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak, a devastating but hopeful YA debut about a ballerina who finds the courage to confront the abuse that haunts her past and threatens her future.

There are two kinds of people on the planet. Hunters and prey I thought I would be safe after my mother died. I thought I could stop searching for new places to hide. But you can’t escape what you are, what you’ve always been.

My name is Savannah Darcy Rose.
And I am still prey.

Though Savannah Rose―Sparrow to her friends and family―is a gifted ballerina, her real talent is keeping secrets. Schooled in silence by her long-dead mother, Sparrow has always believed that her lifelong creed―“I’m not the kind of girl who tells”―will make her just like everyone else: Normal. Happy. Safe. But in the aftermath of a brutal assault by her seemingly perfect boyfriend Tristan, Sparrow must finally find the courage to confront the ghosts of her past, or lose herself forever….

AMAZON | BARNES & NOBLE | BOOK DEPOSITORY

PicsArt_05-02-02.12.14

Sounds interesting? Scroll down below to read an excerpt from the book!

Sparrow Excerpt

1
March
PT. 4

He gathers up all my books, places them carefully in my backpack, and zips it. Then he crawls under the car for my pointe shoes.

“Your suit,” I say, as he wriggles back out. “It’s all dirty now.” He shrugs and smiles. “Doesn’t matter. Assembly’s over, pictures are done.” Cradling my pink satin pointe shoes in both hands, he holds them out like an offering, as though he knows how precious they are to me.

“I’m glad I ran into you, Sparrow.”

“You’re hilarious.” I take my shoes from him and stuff them into my dance bag. I feel like I’m moving in slow motion, my heart, my body unwilling to let this end, my brain knowing that it will, and that when he’s gone, it will feel like none of it ever happened. I try to fix all the details in my brain, right now, so they’ll be there later. So it will be real.

“Thanks. I do what I can.”

“So, anyway,” I say. “Thanks for not killing me, but I need to run. I’m unbelievably late for ballet.”

I head toward the ancient Volvo that my dad lets me drive to school and ballet but nowhere else. Tristan runs after me and grabs my hand.

“Wait, Sparrow. Don’t go. Not yet.”

It feels like my heart has jumped straight up into my throat. “You sure have changed a lot since we were in geography class together,” he says.

“That was fifth grade, Tristan. We’ve all changed. The last time you spoke to me, you said nobody likes ballerinas and ballet was stupid.”

His eyes widen and he puts his hand over his heart and staggers backward, like he’s had a sudden shock. “Seriously? I said that?”

“You did. I remember every word.” “Wow, I was kind of a jackass, wasn’t I?” “Yeah, you kind of were.”

“I was wrong. And ballet is awesome.” I can’t help it. I laugh.

“Right. Have you actually been to any of our performances? You don’t exactly seem like the kind of person who’d be wild about ballet.”

“Okay, totally busted. But my mother’s on the conservatory board, and she’s always talking about you. She showed me that article that was in the paper last year. She says you’re mad taented.”

That article is still taped to the refrigerator. My father refuses to take it down. He even highlighted the line about me being “the rising star of the Appalachian Conservatory Ballet” and called me “Superstar” for a week. It was mortifying.

I  feel myself blushing, the red stain creeping all the way  up my neck and into my cheeks. Now my freckles will look awesome. “You should come see a performance with your mom sometime. “Maybe I will,” he says softly. He reaches out and cups my face in the palm of his hand, stroking my cheek with his thumb. “You’re blushing.” He’s so close I can feel his warm breath on my skin.

My knees go all rubbery, and I picture myself falling downright where I’m standing, fainting like a Victorian maiden in one of my aunt Sophie’s romance novels.

When I speak, my voice comes out all shaky and whispery. “Listen, really, thanks for the Band-Aids and everything. But I’ve got to go. We get fined five dollars every time we’re late for class. I’m sorry I ran out in front of you. Hope I didn’t give you a heart attack or anything.”

He smiles and pushes his sun-streaked hair out of his eyes. He has deep dimples on both sides of his mouth. “Have dinner with me on Saturday. Please. Let me make up for almost killing you.”

Copyright © 2020 by Mary Cecilia Jackson


About the Author 

Mary Cecilia Jackson has worked as a middle school teacher, an adjunct instructor of college freshmen, a technical writer and editor, a speechwriter, a museum docent, and a development officer for central Virginia’s PBS and NPR stations. Her first novel, Sparrow, was an honor recipient of the SCBWI Sue Alexander Award and a young-adult finalist in the Writers’ League of Texas manuscript contest. She lives with her architect husband, William, in Western North Carolina and Hawaii, where they have a farm and five ridiculously adorable goats.

Join the Giveaway

5 Winners will receive a Copy of SPARROW by Mary Cecilia Jackson. Click the photo below to join!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s